Breads braided ,White, Whole Wheat, and Rye Braid

White, Whole Whea t, and Rye Braid

  Braided breads are pretty, but unless you’re making just one type of dough and braiding it, many recipes require making a full recipe of each type of dough. This recipe makes just one loaf of braided bread.
  The vital wheat gluten in the rye dough helps give it a little more structure, but if you don’t have it on hand, don’t fret. It’s there for insurance, but you can leave it out if you have to. If you do leave out the gluten, you’ll need slightly less water, so cut back to just 1⁄2 cup.

breads Braided ,White, Whole Whea t, and Rye Braid
Makes 1 loaf approximat ely 14 inches long

Ingredients :

For the rye do ugh :

  1. 1⁄2 cup plus 1 tablespoon room temperature water
  2. 1 teaspoon active dry yeast
  3. 1 teaspoon sugar
  4. 3⁄4 cup (33⁄8 ounces) bread flour
  5. 1⁄2 cup (21⁄2 ounces) dark rye flour
  6. 1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt
  7. 1 teaspoon vital wheat gluten
  8. 1 teaspoon cocoa powder
  9. 2 teaspoons unsalted butter, at room temperature

For the whole whea t do ugh :

  1. 1 egg plus room temperature water to equal 1⁄2 cup
  2. 1 teaspoon active dry yeast
  3. 1 teaspoon sugar
  4. 3⁄4 cup (33⁄8 ounces) bread flour
  5. 1⁄2 cup (21⁄4 ounces) whole wheat flour
  6. 1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt
  7. 1 teaspoon unsalted butter, at room temperature

For the white do ugh :

  1. 1⁄2 cup room temperature water
  2. 1 teaspoon active dry yeast
  3. 1 teaspoon sugar
  4. 11⁄4 cups (55⁄8 ounces) bread flour, plus more as needed
  5. 1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt
  6. 1 teaspoon olive oil

On prep day :

1. For all three doughs, the instructions are the same: mix all ingredients until combined (in a medium bowl or in the bowl of your stand mixer), then knead by hand or in a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook until the dough is elastic.
I suggest starting with the rye dough, then the wheat, then the white. (The rye rises a bit more slowly, so it’s good to give it a head start; white rises most quickly.)
2. After each dough is prepared, place it in a medium bowl, cover, and set aside in a warm place. When you’ve finished preparing the third dough, set a timer for 45 minutes and let all of the doughs rise.
3. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
4. When the doughs have risen, flour your work surface lightly. One at a time, turn out each dough and form it into a rope (as a child would roll a snake from clay) about 20 inches long.
5. Line up the three pieces of dough next to each other. Pinch the three together at one end, then braid them loosely. When you finish, pinch the ends together.
Transfer the dough to the parchment-lined baking sheet. I like to arrange it diagonally on the sheet for more space. Tuck the pinched ends under to hide them, and straighten and arrange the dough so it’s even. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight or up to 24 hours.

On baking day :

1. Remove the baking sheet from the refrigerator and heat the oven to 350°F.
2. Remove the plastic and bake the bread until it is nicely browned and the internal temperature reaches 205°F on an instant-read thermometer, about 25 minutes.
Transfer the loaf on parchment to a rack and let it cool completely before slicing.

Other recipes Breads : Here
Resource : book make ahead breads
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